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Course rationale

The Master of Management (Organisation Dynamics) is designed for work-experienced professionals who wish to develop their managerial capacities through the application of systems psychodynamic concepts to their actual experience of managing. It supports the development of individual capacities to shape and to take up work roles that are meaningful, values-based, and which serve the ultimate purpose of the organisation.

The course fosters analytic and academic skills aimed at deepening students’ understanding of the unique demands of particular work systems and enhancing their appreciation of the professional, political, cultural, emotional and ethical nuances of organisational life. It provides industry relevant, post-graduate education grounded in rigorous conceptual development and work experience.

Students can expect a course that:

  • integrates work experience with academic theory
  • uses international industry benchmarking to enhance course development, delivery and relevance
  • provides opportunities for engagement with real world learning in a social and global context
  • facilitates connections across disciplines and contexts through an integration of psychological, sociological, anthropological, management, and philosophical approaches to organisations.

Students will be provided with leading edge theory and applied methods relevant to Systems Psychodynamics; workshops and learning modalities focused on the development of professional expertise in their work settings; work role consultation; and a supervised, applied research project written as an article to standard publishable in a professional journal.

The design provides:

  • A rigorous academic course that integrates work experience with published academic theory;
  • Opportunities for industry to enhance course development, delivery and renewal;
  • Engagement of students with real world learning in a social and global context;
  • Connections across disciplines and contexts through an integration of psychological, sociological, anthropological, management, and philosophical approaches to organisations.